Timing helps Sir Mick Jagger’s money making

Among the alumni of the London School of Economics, many have gone on to earn vast fortunes.

The illustrious list includes Easyjet founder Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou, French billionaire Delphine Arnault, and financier George Soros.

Sir Mick Jagger says The Rolling Stones did not always make a lot of money

Sir Mick Jagger says The Rolling Stones did not always make a lot of money

One of its less conventional former students is Sir Mick Jagger, whose estimated £190m stash looks measly compared to the wealth of those above.

Gimme Shelter (1970) – Rock & roll film school: 10 Cool rock documentaries

But while those riches are ultimately down to his song writing, singing and guitar playing – business nous has undeniably played a part.

His band, The Rolling Stones, have released about 90 singles and more than two dozen studio albums.

And still selling out huge arenas and stadia, they also control the touring, the merchandise and sponsorship side of the business.

But in a rare interview, Sir Mick admitted to the BBC that he was lucky in the timing of his career.

“When the Stones started out they didn’t make any money out of records because record companies didn’t pay you,” he said.

“Nobody got paid. I always wonder if Frank Sinatra got paid.

“Your royalty was so low. If you sold a million records you got a million pennies. It was all very nice, but not what you imagined you were going to get.”

Rich lists

However things changed as musicians became more adept at controlling their creations.

This came at about the time the Stones hit what many see as their peak, which included the 1972 release of the critically acclaimed Exile on Main Street.

Later the boom in music sales through the development of the compact disc bolstered the earnings of those on lucrative royalty deals.

“There was a small period from 1970 to 1997 where people did get paid and they got paid very handsomely,” Sir Mick said.

More: Timing helps Sir Mick Jagger’s money making – By Simon Atkinson, Business reporter, BBC News

Gimme Shelter (1970) – Rock & roll film school: 10 Cool rock documentaries

Mick Jagger

Mick Jagger

More than 300,000 people attended the Rolling Stones’ infamous free concert at the Altamont Speedway in December 1969, but one, Meredith Hunter, never made it home. Instead, the 18-year-old was stabbed by Hells Angels hired to provide security, and his killing provided the inadvertent dramatic crux of “Gimme Shelter,” perhaps the most notorious rock doc in history. “Reactive” filmmakers Albert & David Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin capture the events leading up to the disastrous gig, including recording sessions at Alabama’s Muscle Shoals studio and a show at New York’s Madison Square Garden (with openers Ike & Tina Turner), but it is the drama at Altamont, captured on film, that has made “Gimme Shelter” infamous.

By Sean Plummer, June 10, 2010 – msn entertainment news

Vélemény, hozzászólás?

Adatok megadása vagy bejelentkezés valamelyik ikonnal:

WordPress.com Logo

Hozzászólhat a WordPress.com felhasználói fiók használatával. Kilépés /  Módosítás )

Google kép

Hozzászólhat a Google felhasználói fiók használatával. Kilépés /  Módosítás )

Twitter kép

Hozzászólhat a Twitter felhasználói fiók használatával. Kilépés /  Módosítás )

Facebook kép

Hozzászólhat a Facebook felhasználói fiók használatával. Kilépés /  Módosítás )

Kapcsolódás: %s

%d blogger ezt szereti: